Power Electronics

National Lab Receives Award For Safer Battery

Researchers at Sandia National Laboratories and their collaborators have been recognized by R&D Magazine with an R&D 100 award for their solid-state, fluoride-based battery. This battery is notable because it is safer than traditional batteries when used in high-temperature applications such as oil, gas, and geothermal drilling. The magazine presents its R&D 100 awards to what it deems are the “100 most technologically significant products introduced into the marketplace over the past year.”



The HTSS10V battery was developed in conjunction with the High Power Battery Systems Company in Nizhny Novgorod Russia and General Atomics. Limited production of the batteries began in 2005 at Russia’s VNIIEF Institute. Under a joint program with Sandia and General Atomics, the batteries will be produced in Sarov, Russia, and in San Diego, Calif.



Solid-state fluoride ion batteries have nearly the same energy density of lithium sulfuryl batteries while being inherently safe. The battery consists of nontoxic fluoride, and all three battery components of the HTSS10V—anode, cathode, and ionic conductor—are solid, making it the best and safest choice for high-temperature activities according to Sandia.



Traditional lithium batteries are at risk of exploding or leaking chemicals under high-temperature uses. Solid-state battery technology offers the largest temperature range—room temperature to 500ºC—of any battery technology. Other advantages of solid-state batteries include the ability to be flown on commercial aircraft and longer shelf life and greater reliability in emergency situations.



Researchers are currently working on a rechargeable version of this battery for laptop computers. For more information, see www.sandia.gov

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