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USA Science & Engineering Festival Announces Nifty Fifty Program

To ignite middle and high school students' passion for science and engineering, the USA Science & Engineering Festival, hosted by Lockheed Martin, will send more than 100 top scientists and engineers into Washington, DC-area schools this March and April. The Nifty Fifty program is part of the lead up to the Festival Expo which will take place at the DC Convention Center on April 28-29.

"We hope that by meeting scientists and engineers who love what they do, students will embrace these disciplines and consider careers in them," said Larry Bock, Executive Director of the USA Science & Engineering Festival.

AT&T supports the Nifty Fifty (times 2), as they are called, all of whom the Festival organizers carefully chose from hundreds of applicants for their differing fields, talents, divergent backgrounds and ages. They were also selected for their ability to convey the importance of science to young audiences and to the non-science public.

"AT&T is committed to helping inspire and educate the next generation of innovators through a range of activities focused on STEM fields," said Rob Forsyth, vice president and general manager for the greater Washington/Baltimore area. "By providing school kids with first-hand experiences with scientists, engineers and leading professionals, through activities like the Nifty Fifty program and mentoring and volunteering opportunities in the communities where we live and work, AT&T is working to demystify science and technology for kids."

The Nifty Fifty scientists and engineers include high technology entrepreneurs and financiers, policy makers, actors, journalists, educators, researchers, explorers, storm chasers, video game developers, alien hunters, astronauts and brain surgeons.

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