EET

ENERGY FIGURES OF THE MONTH

Consumption of renewables growing at 2.8% each year

According to the International Energy Outlook 2011, compiled by the U.S. Energy Information Administration, the use of all energy sources will rise through 2035. Petroleum and other liquid fuels are now the world's slowest-growing energy sources. Consumption of liquid fuels will increase at an annual rate of 1% from 2008 to 2035, whereas total energy demand will grow by 1.6% each year. On the other end of the spectrum, renewables are the world's fastest-growing energy sources, with consumption rising by 2.8% every year. Analysts say that relatively high projected oil prices, plus concern about the environmental impacts of fossil fuels, are driving the growth seen in renewables. And in many countries, government incentives are still improving their prospects.

U.S. among world leaders in wind capacity

By the end of 2010, there was approximately 194.4 GW of installed wind capacity worldwide, a 22% increase over 2009. The U.S. now has more than 40 GW of installed wind capacity. Other world leaders with significant investments in wind technology include China, Germany, Spain, and Italy, among others.

Source: Strategies and Decision Support Systems for Integrating Variable Energy Resources in Control Centers for Reliable Grid Operations by Lawrence E. Jones.

Government policies driving worldwide wind growth

Wind capacity is expected to continue expanding in the U.S., European Union (EU), and the rest of the world in the years ahead thanks to several factors, including strong governmental regulatory and policy measures. For example, 27 U.S. states have enacted Renewable Portfolio Standards (RPS) requiring that between 10% and 40% of a state's energy must come from renewable sources by 2015 to 2030. There's a similar growth trajectory for the U.S. and EU regarding wind capacity.

Source: Strategies and Decision Support Systems for Integrating Variable Energy Resources in Control Centers for Reliable Grid Operations by Lawrence E. Jones.

TAGS: Content
Hide comments

Comments

  • Allowed HTML tags: <em> <strong> <blockquote> <br> <p>

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Publish