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EE&T News: December 20, 2010

EE&T News: December 20, 2010

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December 20, 2010 Issue:

• An energy efficient holiday season
• Electric super-bike goes racing
• Are quantum-dot LEDs in your future?
• In electric buses, two batteries are better than one
• Coming: Combo energy scavenger, electronics chips
• Energy Shorts

An energy efficient holiday season

The Obamas officially kicked off the holiday season by lighting the White House Christmas tree, decorated with LED lights and LED snowflake ornaments. If you want to get the inside track on new Energy Star certification requirements for lighting, consider signing up for our upcoming energy/lighting summit in Orlando: www.eetweb.com/conferences/illuminate/index.html

As always, send your energy efficiency news to [email protected]
Leland Teschler, Editor Read More

FEATURED CONTENT

Electric super-bike goes racing

Swigz.com Pro Racing will make history on Jan. 9, 2011 when what is billed as the world's most powerful and technically advanced electric superbike will compete head-to-head against conventional gasoline-powered race bikes in a professionally organized roadrace at the Auto Club Speedway in Fontana, Calif. The Swigz Racing machine is said to have a power-to-weight ratio slightly better than that of 600-cc gasoline bikes, and will begin the 2011 season competing in the WERA Pirelli Sportsman Heavyweight Twins Superbike class where its power to weight ratio puts it in the middle of the field. READ MORE Read More

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Are quantum-dot LEDs in your future?

Quantum-dot light emitting diode (QLED) displays could eventually be the technology of choice for such applications as computer screens and TVs now usually handled by LCDs. So predicts QD Vision, a spin-off from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The company recently hooked up with LG Display in Korea and chemical supplier Solvay in Belgium to develop and manufacture active matrix QLED displays. READ MORE Read More

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In electric buses, two batteries are better than one

No matter how you cut it, the battery it takes to power an electric vehicle the size of a city bus is still pretty big. That is why researchers at GE recently came up with the idea of pairing two different battery technologies as a means of boosting vehicle performance while providing a long range. They say their idea also has the potential to cut battery costs by 20%. READ MORE Read More

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Coming: Combo energy scavenger, electronics chips

It looks as though the next generation of energy scavengers could combine scavenging mechanisms such as solar cells and vibration sensors with electronics, all on the same silicon chip. This is one of the conclusions that might be drawn from the recently completed International Electron Device Meeting in San Francisco, where researchers from several institutions reported progress on devising such combo devices. READ MORE Read More

Energy Shorts

How to export energy efficiency technology
Color LED kit promotes efficient lighting design
Step-down converters consume only 25 uA
DirectFET MOSFET chipset targets dc-dc conversion
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VIDEO

Featured video: Design criteria for solid-state lighting

Mike Pena from NXP Corp. spoke at EE&T's Tech Day event about development project for a solid-state lighting equivalent to a PAR 30/38 lamp. Watch a video of his presentation which goes into design criteria for power consumption, light output, operational life, and lumens/watt performance.
Watch video

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